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August 27, 2012 / Angela Sylvia

Manga: Yotsuba&! Volume 11, Witch & Wizard Volume 2

My manga reading hasn’t been picking up too much speed, but this week I was able to take a look at two more volumes fro Yen Press: one thing that I love, and one that I’m just indifferent to.

First was Yotsuba&!volume 11. When the new volume of Yotsuba&! shows up on my doorstep, I am filled with delight. There is no exciting action or important worldly or emotional problems being dealt with in this series, but I know when I see the cover with the little green-haired girl on it I’m going to read a story of pure fun. Without surprise, Yotsuba is up to the same childish goofiness in this volume. She watches a man make udon, tries pizza for the first time, and worries when a friend (her teddy bear Juralumin) has to undergo surgery after being chewed on by a dog. By far, my favorite episode is when Yotsuba’s nemesis, her father’s friend Yanda, comes to visit and proceeds to taunt Yotsuba as he brings out progressively cooler bubble toys that he says she’s too little to play with.  I don’t know how he’s managed it, but Azuma has taken a single concept — a hyperactive, dopey child having fun discovering simple things — and still manages to keep it strong and interesting through 11 volumes.

ISBN: 978031622597 • MSRP $11.99 • Released September 25, 2012

James Patterson and Svetlana Chmakova’s Witch & Wizard  invokes less delight. I took a look at volume 1 of this adaptation of a YA dystopian novel in my first installment of Comic Conversion on Manga Bookshelf, where I noted the quick, constant action that pulls you pretty easily through the story. But the story is so shallow, with the speed of the story also working against the comic. Important things happen one after the other, with little to no time to dwell on them. Betrayals take a couple of pages, allies are introduced then swept away, and months of capture fly by. What could have been an involved love story between Wisty and another teenager begins and ends so fast I actually forgot about it (as Wisty apparently did) until it was brought up again near the end of the book. The variety of magic is interesting, but it also feels like the creators just make something up whenever they need the characters to escape. And I still don’t understand the villain, “The One Who is the One”, with his motivations and desires changing with the wind. Again, one of the saving graces of this comic is Chmakova’s art, imbuing Whit, Wisty, and all the other characters with more depth and emotion than I think Patterson is capable of.

ISBN: 9780316119917 • MSRP $12.99 • Released June 26, 2012

Review copies were provided by Yen Press.

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